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Unhealthy relationships can start early and last a lifetime.

Teens often think some behaviors, like teasing and name-calling, are a “normal” part of a relationship.

The survey findings were released today, during a forum to educate students about sexual assault prevention and survivor assistance at American University. National Dating Abuse Helpline and Break the Cycle Respond to the Urgent Need for Education In direct response to these new findings, a partnership between the National Dating Abuse Helpline and leading teen dating violence prevention organization, Break the Cycle, is launching an initiative to target college students with new, relevant resources to address the issue of dating abuse.

The expanded online content includes: Take Action (information on how students can get involved on their campus), Stay Safe (safety planning designed specifically for college students) and Help a Friend (information to assist bystanders).

Break the Cycle believes everybody has the right to safe and healthy relationships.

Whether it’s teaching young people about the warning signs of abuse, safety planning or how to navigate the legal system, Break the Cycle gives teens and young adults the tools they need to live safer, healthier lives.

(Fisher, Cullen, and Turner, 2000) - About 90% of survivors on a college campus know the person who assaulted them.

(Fisher et al.) The American College Health Association (ACHA) carried out The National College Health Assessment (NCHA) in Fall 2011.

Sexual Assault on College Campuses Scope of the Issue - About 1 in 4 women will be sexually assaulted before the end of their college career.

Their survey of 8,960 male students and 18,308 female students found that: - 3% of male students and 7% of female students reported experiencing sexual touching without their consent.

- 1% of male students and 3% of female students reported experiencing attempted sexual penetration without their consent.

They train these young leaders to offer support, information and advocacy to those involved in dating abuse relationships as well as concerned parents, teachers, clergy, law enforcement and service providers.

Break the Cycle engages, educates and empowers youth to build lives and communities free from domestic and dating violence.

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