Consolidating memories updating a ranch style home

There is, however, some evidence that the hippocampus can be involved in older memories — perhaps when they are particularly vivid.

A recent idea that has been floated suggests that the entorhinal cortex, through which all information passes on its way to the hippocampus, handles “incremental learning” — learning that requires repeated experiences.

Although the exact mechanisms are not known, learning and memory are often described in terms of three functions.

Acquisition refers to the introduction of new information into the brain.

Consolidation represents the processes by which a memory becomes stable.

Recall refers to the ability to access the information (whether consciously or unconsciously) after it has been stored.

The entorhinal cortex, on the other hand, gives evidence of temporally graded changes extending up to 20 years, suggesting that it is this region that participates in memory consolidation over decades.

In modern consolidation theory, it is assumed that new memories are initially 'labile' and sensitive to disruption before undergoing a series of processes (e.g., glutamate release, protein synthesis, neural growth and rearrangement) that render the memory representations progressively more stable.However, animal and human studies suggest that the quantity and quality of sleep have a profound impact on learning and memory.Research suggests that sleep helps learning and memory in two distinct ways.This raises the question: does reconsolidation involve the previously stable representation, or the establishment of a new representation, that coexists with the old?Whether reconsolidation is the creating of a new representation, or the modifying of an old, is this something other than the reconstruction of memories as they are retrieved?

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