Updating windows 2016 to xp

It’s been two years since Microsoft ended support for Windows XP, the popular operating system that’s been around since 2001 and which many people just don’t seem willing to let go.

Microsoft did about all it could to drag XP-ers into the present with pop-up warnings urging them that they need to upgrade, and a free migration tool to help people transfer their files and settings to Windows 7 or Windows 8.

You can’t simply install the updates -- that would be too easy -- and you’ll receive a version mismatch error if you try. If it’s not showing up as a registry file, open any folder, go to Tools Save it, and then double-click the file. This trick only works for 32-bit editions of XP, but there’s a workaround for 64-bit versions here.

Naturally, there’s no way of knowing how long this trick will work -- Microsoft could put a stop to it at any moment.

The other 2 havn't had their April security updates installed yet (there are 7 waiting to be downloaded) and these machines don't exhibit this behavior.Also, because you’re installing updates for a system other than Windows XP, there’s the possibility that not all updates will work as intended. Question: If Windows XP support has stopped, why am I still getting updates?Things look slightly better when you look at OS market share measured by a different company, Stats Counter, but there’s still an alarming number of PCs running XP.According to Stat Counter, Windows XP represents 7.4% of all desktops in April 2016, down from 10.9% in April 2015. But when you consider that Microsoft puts the number of Windows devices at more than 1 billion, we are still talking about tens of millions of computers today running a very old, very outdated, and very insecure operating system.

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